Guitar covers – F-BOD http://f-bod.com/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 13:23:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://f-bod.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/fbod-150x150.png Guitar covers – F-BOD http://f-bod.com/ 32 32 Tori Amos’ “Strange Little Girls” is a discreetly triumphant collection of blankets that endures 20 years later https://f-bod.com/tori-amos-strange-little-girls-is-a-discreetly-triumphant-collection-of-blankets-that-endures-20-years-later/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 12:00:00 +0000 https://f-bod.com/tori-amos-strange-little-girls-is-a-discreetly-triumphant-collection-of-blankets-that-endures-20-years-later/ Tori Amos has always been a connoisseur of covers. Early in her career, she garnered praise for her careful, piano-oriented renditions of Nirvana’s “Smells like Teen Spirit” and Led Zeppelin’s “Thank You”. On tour, she is known for having covered a wide variety of artists, including George Michael, INXS, Fleetwood Mac, The Beatles and Kansas. […]]]>

Tori Amos has always been a connoisseur of covers. Early in her career, she garnered praise for her careful, piano-oriented renditions of Nirvana’s “Smells like Teen Spirit” and Led Zeppelin’s “Thank You”. On tour, she is known for having covered a wide variety of artists, including George Michael, INXS, Fleetwood Mac, The Beatles and Kansas.

On September 18, 2001, Amos released his most ambitious cover picks to date: a full-length album, “Strange Little Girls,” featuring his renditions of songs written by men. More than that, however, the collection offers an intriguing premise: What if some very famous songs from very famous men were more about and about women?

This premise could easily have gotten quite fanciful. However, Amos’ empathy for the subjects of writing makes “Strange Little Girls” a low-key and subtle triumph. This is most evident on a superlative cover of “Rattlesnakes” by Lloyd Cole & The Commotions. The song features a main character named Jodie, who “wears a hat even though it hasn’t rained for six days” and carries a gun “because of all the rattlesnakes.”

Cole is an empathetic writer himself, and so his character sketch of Jodie offers revealing details (“her never-born child still haunts her”) that explain her behavior. Always insightful, Amos understands Jodie’s grief; her voice is dripping with sadness and understanding, ensuring that the cover ends up being deeply touching.

In terms of vibe, however, “Strange Little Girls” felt like a continuation of her 1999 double album, “To Venus and Back,” which was heavy with atmospheric electronic elements. His version of The Beatles’ “Happiness Is a Warm Gun” features short stories and sampled keyboards that resemble experimental electronic compositions, as well as guitarist Adrian Belew adding the occasional jerky riff.

Belew is more effective, however, on Amos’ languid cover of “New Age” from the Velvet Underground, when her jagged electric bolts emerge as she sings the line “I’ll run.” This shade appears everywhere in “Strange Little Girls” offers many moods. “I don’t like Mondays” is sparse and haunting; 10cc’s “I’m Not In Love” is menacing and disturbing, playing the obsessive side of the song; and on “Enjoy The Silence” she doubles her vocals, making the song feel more like a heart-to-heart conversation.

The namesake song from the album – and the most upbeat and simplest musical moment, as it features tumbleweed keyboards – is “Strange Little Girl”. The 1982 single Stranglers featuring a figuratively lost protagonist and trying to find her place in the world: “Strange little girl / Where are you going?” / Do you know where you could go? The word “strange” is interesting to describe a person. The term is not always used as a compliment; in fact, it’s a verbal detour from convention. “Strange” is a close relationship with “particular,” another vaguely ancient sounding word that evokes someone who is quirky and different. Even more telling is that Amos called the album “Strange Little Girls” – plural – it’s a collection of quirky people who don’t fit any sort of tidy mold.

Fittingly, for every song on “Strange Little Girls”, Amos portrays a different woman. The cover notes even show her photographed in costume, disguised as these characters. The “Rattlesnakes” Tori has straight blonde hair and a KISS jacket. “New Age” Tori looks like a hip librarian, with black hair rolled back to the ends and cat-eye glasses, while the main character has dramatic eye makeup, a shag cut, and a shirt that says “Satin Worship” . And “Real Men” Tori is a provocative tomboy, in a powerful outfit: a white suit and a wide belt.

In a 2001 interview with the Rolling Stone website, Amos explained how the characters on the album were born. “I knew that when I started to deconstruct each male song, a different woman seemed to have access to me,” she said. “There was an exchange; there was an exchange. If I had to take that into account and deconstruct it, get into these men and stay in their heads, then a woman had access to me, and it really got to me. surprised.”

Elsewhere in the conversation, she reflected on who these women were and where they came from. “Are they the anima of the writers? I don’t know. Are they the girls themselves personified? Not in all cases. Every woman has a very different relationship to her song. Some women are implied, some women are clearly there, written in the song of the male writer. “


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Unsurprisingly, “Strange Little Girls” connects most strongly to songs where women are involved, as the blur allows Amos’ creativity to soar. On a roaring “Heart of Gold,” as loud as Young’s guitar hurricanes, Amos saw twins – or “economic spy girls,” as she tells Alternative Press – who “infiltrate businesses and gain access to information and send it somewhere else. Good or bad, it depends on which side you’re on. ” This backstory is certainly not evident from listening to Neil Young’s song, which is a loose and weary meditation on finding meaning in life and in oneself. However, Amos’ vision certainly complicates what the song’s reference to a “heart of gold” might mean.

Then there’s Slayer’s “Raining Blood,” a song about a person mired in purgatory after being cast out of the sky; the implication is that it’s somewhere he doesn’t want to be. Amos takes a different point of view: instead, she sees Purgatory as a place of safety, a refuge for a badass with supernatural tendencies. “She is a French resistance fighter whose sister was killed”, she declared. Alternative press about the character from “Raining Blood”, who wears a casual beret and holds an ashy cigarette. The woman “knows the myths and appeals to power and works on alchemy” in response, however: “She went underground after the deaths of everyone she knew.”

Amos has spent much of his career after “Strange Little Girls” writing songs about forgotten real-life women or historical figures. There is something so poignant about Amos bringing life and dignity to these fictional women by fleshing out their personalities and portraying them as three-dimensional characters. In countless classic songs, women are more like unfilled outlines, known only as “she” or “she”. In addition to being anonymous, these women are pristine and ghostly vessels onto which emotions are projected. Life happens to them; they are not people with their own agency. On “Strange Little Girls,” Amos features intricate personalities and intricate plot details – expanding musical history narratives that are often male-centric and frustrating.

This does not mean that “Strange Little Girls” follows a strict binary. For example, Amos associates Joe Jackson’s “Real Men”, a song with sharp observations on gender, sexuality and stereotypes, with a deliberately androgynous character; his solemn and relatively straightforward reading of the song asks questions rather than providing answers.

But nowhere is Amos’ point of view clearer than his portrayal of Eminem’s “’97 Bonnie and Clyde”. This particular blanket received the most attention at the time; lyrically, it’s a graphic song in which the rapper describes laying out his wife’s body in front of his little girl. (Notably, the dead woman is only called “Mama.”) Amos, however, recovers the song and its violence from Eminem. With a whispered, hoarse voice, she tells the song from a mother’s perspective, while dramatic, string-heavy music that resembles silent film music revolves around her. The murdered woman’s life is centered and important; she gave a voice to foreshadow the consequences of the crime.

Ultimately, Amos sees the main character as the girl who witnessed the crime, only “any adult, having to face the fact that she was an accomplice in the murder,” she said. Alternative press. “She’s a dichotomy of things because she’s divided.” The “strange little girl” here is (understandably) left confused and helpless. Still, Amos’ delivery on the song feels like a soft landing, or rather a solace for the girl. Of course, Tori deeply protects all of the “Strange Little Girls” on this album – and that’s why it’s a collection of covers that endures.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=videoseries


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Dave Matthews Band’s performance is worth the wait https://f-bod.com/dave-matthews-bands-performance-is-worth-the-wait/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 01:21:50 +0000 https://f-bod.com/dave-matthews-bands-performance-is-worth-the-wait/ Dave Matthews is a brave man, standing in front of 16,000 fans, strumming and singing the difficult voice of “Rye Whiskey” as his band sat and watched at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center. These are fans who bought their tickets for a canceled show in July 2020 and are finally seeing the Dave Matthews Band […]]]>

Dave Matthews is a brave man, standing in front of 16,000 fans, strumming and singing the difficult voice of “Rye Whiskey” as his band sat and watched at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center. These are fans who bought their tickets for a canceled show in July 2020 and are finally seeing the Dave Matthews Band after more than a year of waiting. He stood there, his face crumpled, his high falsetto voice screaming the slow, emotional lines, “If you don’t give me my rye whiskey, I’ll surely die.”

From there, the whole band moved on to the mellow “One Sweet World” and “That Girl is You”, and the show was going on, up and down with each song, some moments higher than others, but all. the music was tight, smooth and exciting.

Matthews is nothing but exciting. He can incorporate a slow-build into anyone’s song, thus structuring almost all of his live tracks. The band members – cool as any great touring band could be – instantly fell into their pockets and changed their tempo in no time at all, as they did on “So Damn Lucky”, a tune that swayed well, built in crescendo, then dropped to rebuild again. The band worked hard on this tune, and well without a clear leader, lead guitarist Tim Reynolds strumming with Matthews. This song, along with the previous “Pig”, took the show to the next level, where it stayed a good part of the night.

A mix of tired covers – Huey Lewis and a few Rolling Stones – with “Jimi Thing” was fun, let the band members stretch a bit, but added little to the night. On the contrary, it gave everyone a rest before the show went into its final stage of big DMB tunes.

The show soared in its home stretch with “Say Good-bye” and “Why I Am” and “Stay”.

The group switched between a rock show and jam band moments. Although he is relaxed and expands tunes with horn, reed, keyboard and guitar solos – even alternate soloists within a choir – he rarely leaves the script. But the script is strong and in a way the band keeps it fresh for every show.

Matthews has a lot of personalities on a lot of different songs. He is one of the best male singers in pop-rock, from ballads to jazzy pop to rock ‘n roll. But he’s not afraid either. In “Minaret,” a melody that advances and challenges typical popular chord progressions, which you can take or leave, Matthews walks up to the mic and screams. Not a little cry: he twists his body with a series of primitive screams, his face threatening to burst. A real madman, and a message to his fans – I am all for you and for me. How he has a voice left after that, I don’t know.

Granted, he’s still bustling and worked hard through the night. Her fans also work hard, dancing through tunes and celebrating the first hit of each new tune. The show required proof of vaccination or proof of a recent negative COVID test. Beyond that, fans were crammed like sardines having fun like never before, rarely a mask in sight. Matthews and his band made it easy to forget everything except the music.

See the show from the perspective of our personal photographer Erica Miller here.

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Categories: Entertainment, Saratoga County


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Barre’s Opera Reopens: Folk Icon Tom Rush Begins 2021-22 Celebration Series | Vermont Arts https://f-bod.com/barres-opera-reopens-folk-icon-tom-rush-begins-2021-22-celebration-series-vermont-arts/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://f-bod.com/barres-opera-reopens-folk-icon-tom-rush-begins-2021-22-celebration-series-vermont-arts/ The reopening of the newly renovated Barre Opera House will be celebrated with the return to Vermont of a singularly respected artist, folk singer Tom Rush, at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, September 25. Rush is no stranger to audiences and venues in Vermont, and we have praised him in the past by giving him the […]]]>

The reopening of the newly renovated Barre Opera House will be celebrated with the return to Vermont of a singularly respected artist, folk singer Tom Rush, at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, September 25.

Rush is no stranger to audiences and venues in Vermont, and we have praised him in the past by giving him the nickname “New England Folk Singer.” The New Hampshire native, a Harvard graduate, has also lived in Massachusetts and Vermont. There are few performers worthy of the title “legendary”, but Rush, who has been performing and recording since 1962, has certainly earned that title as well.

He’s 80 years old, but his photos reveal a younger-looking man with a full head of white hair and his characteristic bushy mustache. He is the folk singer version of actor Robert Redford. He’s an active artist who has booked a full roster of live concerts and has a non-stop show every week.

Rush is known for his distinctive guitar style, wry humor, and warm, expressive voice. His shows are famous for his pained laughter, his ability to tell great stories, and the sweet melancholy ballads he sings with his passion for gritty blues numbers.

Rush was a Harvard student when he began performing and recording in the early 1960s. He was an early contributor to the folk scene in Boston and New York and, as such, was a contemporary of such luminaries as Bob Dylan, Phil Ochs, Richie Havens and Joan Baez. He was among those who surfed the first wave of urban folk music and has become a staple of the Boston folk music establishment.

His first recording, “Tom Rush at The Unicorn”, dates from 1962. In the years that followed, Rush recorded 26 albums. His latest is the “Voice”. Rush wasn’t the prolific songwriter at the time, more of a songwriter, so his star never reached the level of Dylan or Ochs. He also wore less of the folkloristic “angry man” protester pose than many of his contemporaries.

While Rush may not have written hundreds of often-recorded songs like his contemporaries Dylan or Joni Mitchell, his impact on the American music scene has been profound. He was instrumental in shaping the revival of folk in the 60s and the rebirth of the 80s and 90s, his music having left its mark on generations of artists.

James Taylor told Rolling Stone: “Tom was not only one of my first heroes, but also one of my main influences. Country music star Garth Brooks gave Rush credit for being one of his top five musical influences.

Rush has long championed emerging artists. His early recordings introduced the world to the work of Mitchell, Jackson Browne and Taylor, and in recent years his concerts at Club 47 have brought artists such as the late Nanci Griffith and Shawn Colvin to a wider audience as they began. just building their own reputations.

Rush has written several iconic songs like “No Regrets”, “Merrimac County” and “Driving Wheel”, and recorded covers of “Joshua Gone Barbados” by Eric von Schmidt and “Circle Game” and “Urge for Going” by Mitchell. connected to him in performance.

While nearly six decades of singing and playing could wear out many musicians (Dylan for example), a recent reviewer said that “Rush’s voice is always molasses, smoke and licorice; his fingers still captivate the magic and thunder of every guitar string, and he is as captivating a storyteller as he has ever been.

Over the course of Rush’s long career, his sweet New Hampshire-accented baritone has not suffered the ravages of time but only improved. This was proven on “What I Know”, her first new studio album, released in 2009. After a 35 year hiatus, we heard a Rush whose voice had not diminished given the wear and tear that the one might expect so much performance over such a long period of time. Also, the material was anything but post-retirement geriatric thinking. Unlike Dylan, whose voice now sounds as cranky as it is squeaky, Rush looks like an alternative country crooner in the making.

While studio CDs are fun to listen to, the proof of the courage of a good performer lies in the live performances. There are plenty of them on YouTube to check out as well.

Another gem from an album proving just how good Rush is live is “Tom Rush Trolling for Owls,” a limited edition found only in his shows. This CD contains a lot of jokes on stage and light or downright funny songs. This is pure Tom Rush at his best, showing how entertaining this artist is.

Rush is accompanied on guitar and piano by Berklee College of Music graduate Matt Nakoa. He has two albums to his credit, won a songwriting award from the Kerrville Folk Festival, and has composed music for Disney Productions. He tours regularly on his own and has recently been the regular accompanist for Rush.

The BOH currently requires either proof of vaccination or a printed copy of a negative COVID-19 test result obtained within 72 hours (three days) of the date of the show and masking at all times in the building.


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Sleep Token Delivers Brutal Introspection with “Fall for Me” Video https://f-bod.com/sleep-token-delivers-brutal-introspection-with-fall-for-me-video/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 17:19:31 +0000 https://f-bod.com/sleep-token-delivers-brutal-introspection-with-fall-for-me-video/ The mysterious Sleep Tokens are back with their latest video for the upcoming “Fall for Me” This place will become your tomb album and this latest clip serves as a brutal introspection on our overall needs and desires. The video centers on a lonely figure stumbling through a barren landscape as messages sometimes interrupt the […]]]>

The mysterious Sleep Tokens are back with their latest video for the upcoming “Fall for Me” This place will become your tomb album and this latest clip serves as a brutal introspection on our overall needs and desires.

The video centers on a lonely figure stumbling through a barren landscape as messages sometimes interrupt the on-screen action. “The truth is I have a hard lesson,” one post read, later adding, “in truth itself and how bitter it can be.” “The truth is, I’m ugly, I’m not up to it, I’m lost,” the posts continued, later adding, “The truth is, I want, want, live.”

The song itself is a darker piece of music, further obscuring the group’s unidentified singer with more electronic delivery. And as the video unfolds, our central character emerges from the barren wasteland to finally find the coastal waters in which he will soon be submerged.

“Fall for Me” will join previous “Alkaline” and “The Love You Want” on the highly anticipated second album from Sleep Token, This place will become your tomb. The album is scheduled to arrive on September 24 and pre-orders can be taken through the group website.

Find the group back to the road in November, reaching stops in the UK and Europe en route.

Sleep token, “Fall for me”

Best Metal Songs of 2021 (So Far)

Loudwire’s picks for the best metal songs of 2021 to date.


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Northeast Oklahoma Hometown Concert So Far | Local News https://f-bod.com/northeast-oklahoma-hometown-concert-so-far-local-news/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 01:00:00 +0000 https://f-bod.com/northeast-oklahoma-hometown-concert-so-far-local-news/ MIAMI, Oklahoma. – Music will vibrate inside Rocket Park in Miami on Friday, as local band Until Now takes the stage. The concert, Rockin ‘in Rocket Park, is sponsored by the Ottawa County Musicians’ Tribute Committee. It is part of a series of live shows designed to help reintroduce area residents to the musical heritage […]]]>

MIAMI, Oklahoma. – Music will vibrate inside Rocket Park in Miami on Friday, as local band Until Now takes the stage.

The concert, Rockin ‘in Rocket Park, is sponsored by the Ottawa County Musicians’ Tribute Committee. It is part of a series of live shows designed to help reintroduce area residents to the musical heritage found in Northeast Oklahoma, specifically Ottawa County.

To date, who plays a wide range of genres, includes Gage Lawson on guitar, Jeff Johnston on bass, Joe Redden on drums, Jordan Weston on guitar and Aaron Blile on vocals. Each member is a graduate of Miami High School.

This is the second time this year that the group has performed for a local audience. In July, they were part of Miami’s first Route 66 heritage festival.

Friday’s free event will take place at 7 p.m. at Key Club Park, nicknamed Rocket Park because of its large metal rocket. The food trucks will open their doors at 6 p.m. near the stage.

“We’re very excited with where we grew up,” Lawson said. “It’s a boost for the arts. There is a momentum taking off here. We are happy to be a part of it.

Lawson calls the band’s catalog of music “genderless.”

“The cool thing about our band is that we all take things out of different genres of music,” Lawson said. “We all have different inspirations, but it all fits together.”

Lawson said people can expect to hear not only covers from a variety of artists, but at least one original song.

“Our motivation comes from various artists,” Lawson said. “I think we would become obsolete if we limited our playing to a certain style of music. We show up to practice, play and learn new covers. Something like this keeps us fresh and motivated.

Lawson said he was happy to be one of the musicians who walked through the halls of Miami high school. Other Wardog artists include Keith Anderson and Keifer Thompson of Thompson Square.

“There is a lot of good musical talent in Miami,” Lawson said. “There has always been a track record of promising musicians.”

As the father of two elementary-age daughters, Lawson said Friday’s concert would be “family friendly.”

“It’s for anyone who wants to be able to stay home and attend a free event with live music,” Lawson said. “We’re going to do a whole new range of covers, including some of the sweetest sounds – which is my style, the late 1960s and 1970s, timeless music. “

Behind the concert

Debbie East, with the Ottawa County Musicians’ Tribute Committee, said that in addition to Friday’s concert, the group plans to put on two more live music performances.

The first is scheduled for Saturday, October 2, during the FestiFall event in Miami. It will feature a “musical battle” between 20 groups, with the winner earning a seat to perform at next year’s Route 66 Heritage Festival, among other prizes.

The other event features Bob Wills’ Texas Playboys in a 7 p.m. concert on Friday, November 12 at the Coleman Theater in Miami.

“We want live music to make a comeback in Miami,” East said. “(These concerts) are just another stop on this journey.”


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Gary Lightbody: “There will be an official Snow Patrol album coming up” – Music News https://f-bod.com/gary-lightbody-there-will-be-an-official-snow-patrol-album-coming-up-music-news/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 16:29:54 +0000 https://f-bod.com/gary-lightbody-there-will-be-an-official-snow-patrol-album-coming-up-music-news/ As music fans across the UK begin to prepare for this weekend’s next Isle of Wight festival, Absolute Radio caught up with Snow Patrol singer Gary Lightbody, who will headlining the Saturday night. Speaking to Jay Lawrence of Absolute Radio, Gary relived some of his best festival moments and admitted he was “the least cool […]]]>
As music fans across the UK begin to prepare for this weekend’s next Isle of Wight festival, Absolute Radio caught up with Snow Patrol singer Gary Lightbody, who will headlining the Saturday night.

Speaking to Jay Lawrence of Absolute Radio, Gary relived some of his best festival moments and admitted he was “the least cool person in the world” when he met one of his heroes, often losing the ability to speak very quickly.

“The Isle of Wight has many fond memories in our lives.” Gary said “We played a year when REM was headlining, and we played right before them. We were playing ‘Run’ and I looked to my left and Peter Buck was standing to the side, one of my all time guitar heroes. Then I looked to my right and Michael Stipe was standing on the right side, smiling at me from across the stage, I couldn’t have been happier then. The Isle of Wight gave me this moment.

In addition to learning about Snow Patrol’s upcoming performance at the festival this weekend, the Irish musician also revealed his favorite cover of the band’s hugely successful “Chasing Cars”, discussed this Game of Thrones moment and revealed what everyone already knew, that Dave Grohl is truly the most handsome man in rock.

Gary’s interview through the decades with Jay Lawrence can be heard this Saturday at 11 p.m. on Absolute Radio.

About Dave Grohl: “He’s a lovely, lovely man. We were playing just before the Foo Fighters at the V Festival and just before playing Chasing Cars I dedicated the song to Nirvana and Dave Grohl … Something made me look to my left and walk towards me, I was in the center of the stage with the microphone is Dave Grohl with a huge smile on his face. He was standing next to the stage and looking at us and I didn’t know. He came straight out and gave me a hug, said thank you, waved to the crowd and left. I remained standing like what just happened to me. It was the most surreal experience of my life.

Discussing his appearance in Game of Thrones: “There were people working on the show, and I said I could just stay in the background, just be a member of Night’s Watch or something. They were like maybe we could find something better than that. I didn’t really think about it much more. Weeks and months went by, then I got a phone call to tell me if you would come and sing a song on the show. I was like sure, what song? They said it was in the book, but obviously we added some music, and you just have to learn it and sing it and we want you to be on horseback too. Other than pony rides when I was a kid, I never rode a horse, so I had to go and learn to ride too.

On the many covers of ‘Chasing Cars’: “There is a bagpipe group in Scotland called the Red Hot Chilli Pipers and they did a cover of Chasing Cars which I really like. There have been so many that I love. I’ve had the opportunity to sing it with Ed (Sheeran) a few times, but his version was really sweet when he does it on his own. I browsed the list on Spotify once, and it has continued to scroll for centuries. There are so many blankets. It’s a beautiful thing that so many people cover a song you wrote.

On new Snow Patrol music: “There will be an official Snow Patrol album coming up, you probably know next year. I wrote a lot, we all wrote a lot. The songs are there, we just need to go in and save them. So no matter how long it takes.


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Local acts in downtown Hendersonville at the Mountain State Fair https://f-bod.com/local-acts-in-downtown-hendersonville-at-the-mountain-state-fair/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 04:30:13 +0000 https://f-bod.com/local-acts-in-downtown-hendersonville-at-the-mountain-state-fair/ With the NC Apple Festival under our belt, summer is definitely drawing to a close. Most of Hendo’s street concerts are over, with the exception of Rhythm & Brews. And the NC Mountain State Fair takes place. I certainly look forward to the outdoor music and the cooler weather. I totally missed the first week […]]]>

With the NC Apple Festival under our belt, summer is definitely drawing to a close. Most of Hendo’s street concerts are over, with the exception of Rhythm & Brews.

And the NC Mountain State Fair takes place. I certainly look forward to the outdoor music and the cooler weather.

I totally missed the first week of the show, but there is still a lot of live music in the last few days. From Thursday to Saturday, the music starts at 6 p.m. and ends around 9 p.m., with around five performances each day. That’s a lot of live music for the price of a fair ticket.

On the last day of the fair, Sunday, September 19, the music starts at 4 p.m. In keeping with the fair’s country personality, most of the musicians are bluegrass or country – Buncombe Turnpike, The Muley Holler Gang, Rhiannon & The Relic and Split Rail, to name a few.


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Bob Dylan’s “Springtime in New York” returns to its most failed period https://f-bod.com/bob-dylans-springtime-in-new-york-returns-to-its-most-failed-period/ Tue, 14 Sep 2021 14:11:00 +0000 https://f-bod.com/bob-dylans-springtime-in-new-york-returns-to-its-most-failed-period/ Posted on Sep 14, 2021 9 From a creative time that even Bob Dylan himself has suggested was filled with doubts and a feeling that all mastery of his craft was lost, we receive this remarkable treasure that demonstrates just how hungry and passionate he was. It’s a journey that begins with cute, fun covers […]]]>

Posted on Sep 14, 2021

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From a creative time that even Bob Dylan himself has suggested was filled with doubts and a feeling that all mastery of his craft was lost, we receive this remarkable treasure that demonstrates just how hungry and passionate he was. It’s a journey that begins with cute, fun covers via studio band warm-ups and reimagined versions of its own songs, perhaps just to draw warmth from the incandescent spark of its past, followed by detours that have. produced some of the greatest songs he has ever written, some of which have never even been on the most uneven albums of his career. Confused confusion, that’s for sure.

After converting to Christianity in the late 1970s, Dylan’s music and infamous live performances of the time were seen as a bit juicy and hellish, as the free-thinking borderbreaker began to harass people. sinners and to defend religious parameters. While it was generally believed that he had created a trilogy of gospel records with Slow train coming (1979), Checked in (1980), and Love stroke (1981), he was allegedly disturbed that critics and fans alike were tapping into Love stroke to his predecessors, because he did not see it that way; Jesus Christ has certainly been invoked but, in general, the tone of the album is less evangelical than the previous duet. Either way, he received the worst reviews of his life and he felt like the whole world was on his case, so, a fighter that he is, he went to his corner to figure out how he could dodge all of these. blows.

Spring in New York picks up this story in the fall of 1980, chronicling Dylan’s remarkable creative process via 57 unreleased recordings of songs some of us are familiar with from other versions of previously sanctioned releases or pirated iterations, but most of which are cool because they were trapped in what was “state of the art” but is now obsolete digital recording technology from the 1980s. The set is inspired by sessions for the aforementioned and maligned Love stroke, the “return” of 1983 Infidels, and the “uh oh” of 1985 Burlesque Empire, and that makes each record more fascinating than some of us might have thought. Far from being an abandoned or lost artist, we hear Dylan in full vocal mastery, his imagination spinning the same song in different arrangements, and thinking of future classics whose only flaw lies in the impulsive neglect of their creator (his confidence in making firm decisions about inclusions on the album was shaky, even though her voice and mind were seemingly secure).

For fans of Basement strips and also the “Rolling Thunder Revue” era of hermetic cowardice, the first two of these five records are a fulfilling and confusing game – Dylan and his star bands (during this collection we meet contributions from The Beatles, Stones, Heartbreakers, Sly & Robbie, Dire Straits, the E Street Band and many other luminaries) playing with a kind of aimless glee on a good kick. After ramshackle passages on his own “Señor (Tales of Yankee Power)” and “To Ramona”, there are some really moving and contagious takes of “Jesus Met the Woman at the Well” and “Need a Woman”, with background singers, Carolyn Dennis, Madelyn Quebec and Clydie King, infusing these songs with character and making Dylan roar.

On covers like “Mystery Train” (with both Ringo Starr and Jim Keltner) and “Sweet Caroline”, Dylan replaces their respective galloping peps with measured melancholy; indeed, this version of “Sweet Caroline” could be performed at Caroline’s funeral. These versions of Hank Williams’ “Fever” and “Cold Cold Heart” build on the warmth and untapped desire of their previously felt feelings, with Dylan digging deep, sounding like he’s about to explode. It’s a cool, deconstructive phase – Dylan reimagines classics and other recent hits, like “This Night Won’t Last Forever”, “We Just Disagree” and the obsessive “Let’s Keep it Between Us”, from compelling and memorable way.

Of course, such things will sound like larks to those who clamor for the great “lost” songs of this era, written by Dylan himself. In the excellent and priceless cover notes, the writer Damien Love traces the origins of abandoned pieces like the raucous “Price of Love”, the Desire-y “Don’t Ever Take Yourself Away”, the down blues “Fur Slippers” (possibly taken over by BB King in 1999), the bewitching and astonishing “Borrowed Time”, the discreet threat infused with reggae (the middle of Dylan -song laughing despite) of “Is It Worth It?” and the soft-metal of “Yes Sir, No Sir”, and why they may have been left behind.

The original main take of “Jokerman” from Infidels, among the great tech rescue missions here and an unmistakably great Dylan song of all time, soars thanks to the rhythm section of Sly Dunbar and Robbie Shakespeare, and the swirling guitars of Mick Taylor of the Rolling Stones and – the one of Dylan’s main collaborators in this era – Mark Knopfler of Dire Straits. This momentous configuration made Dylan reach for the sky and he touches it.

Meanwhile, “Blind Willie McTell” continues to live this mysterious life as a forgotten child who has been inexplicably banished from Infidels. After the appearance of an austere version for acoustic piano and guitar on The Bootleg Series Volumes 1-3 (Rare & Unpublished 1961-1991), fans were in awe, angry and bewildered. Even since the years 1969 Great white wonder, rock’s first major bootleg and a remarkable alternate history of Dylan’s recorded production began to circulate, some of his most obsessive fans embarked on all manner of conspiracies about types other songs and news than the camp de Dylan kept people. 2021 brings us this alternate and complete version of the monumental “Blind Willie McTell” on this collection, which is gorgeous, as well as another version that Third Man Records has released as a single. It’s such an overwhelming and poetic song about America, racism and history, Dylan himself was shocked, never having felt like he recorded it well enough to do it justice; with these versions unearthed, at least we come one step closer to receiving every attempt he made.

Indeed, the Infidels sessions include some of the most intriguing “what if?” »Storylines for Dylan and his fans, with songs that didn’t come out alive either being reworked for his follow-up, Burlesque Empire (“Someone’s Got a Hold of My Heart”, “Clean Cut Kid”), or the transformation of an auspicious thing (“Too Late”) into something that was still being shelved (“Foot of Pride”, perhaps best known for Lou the live version of Reed at Dylan’s 30th birthday celebration in 1992).

Reflecting on the types of sounds Dylan might have been chasing, Love ponders the Late Night with David Letterman version of “License to Kill” included here, which starred Dylan backed by members of Plugz, an obscure LA punk band: “Of all the attempts people have made to create their own” ideal ” Infidels, the most ambitious could be that of Canadian musician Daniel Romano, who in 2020 released a cover of the entire album in the Plugz way. “

For its part, this set also gives us an alternative tone and sound to Dylan’s 1980s that we have come to accept as his most awkward and shifted era between decades of genius. In an era when sidekicks like Bruce Springsteen were praised for delivering shrewd and multi-level socio-political songs, Dylan released tunes like “Neighborhood Bully” and “Union Showdown” and was stung by readings not quite at all. inaccurate facts that suggested they were vaguely pro-Israel and pro-America, respectively, fostering the chatter that, because he was older, he was both out of touch and cowardly seeking relevance. To clarify or even correct the recording, the versions of Burlesque Empire Songs like “I’ll Remember You,” “Tight Connection to My Heart (Has Anybody Seen My Love)” and “Emotionally Yours” have been stripped of their dated production elements and are now, suddenly, timeless.

It is the best gift of Spring in New York: it upsets one of Bob Dylan’s most confusing sound epochs, freeing all this material from its time and place. Next to his mid-1960s speed freak growl, Dylan’s “We Are the World” nasal voice of the 1980s is the one comedians and impressionists laughed at the most. Their source material isn’t quite at its peak in 1985, but more so, this collection actually, and surprisingly, shows Dylan, the singer and player, in one of his most imposing phases. The desperation of being fired and ridiculed in his third decade in public life prompted him to draw courage from his convictions and sink his teeth into, say, “New Danville Girl” and “Dark Eyes,” which round off this set and sound like a gunslinger taking on a disrespectful challenge. With Spring in New York, Dylan and his archival custodians take its most stricken off period and rewrite it, capturing its lost glory. (Legacy / Sony BMG)


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Jazz, guitar, choir ready to perform this semester – The Guilfordian https://f-bod.com/jazz-guitar-choir-ready-to-perform-this-semester-the-guilfordian/ Sat, 11 Sep 2021 19:02:02 +0000 https://f-bod.com/jazz-guitar-choir-ready-to-perform-this-semester-the-guilfordian/ From public performances to ensemble lessons, music is an integral part of Guilford College, and the 12-week session promises to be alive. Guilford College offers a variety of music courses, ranging from basic music theory to performance studies in saxophone, harp, and more. These classes can include or result in performances both in college and […]]]>

From public performances to ensemble lessons, music is an integral part of Guilford College, and the 12-week session promises to be alive. Guilford College offers a variety of music courses, ranging from basic music theory to performance studies in saxophone, harp, and more. These classes can include or result in performances both in college and away from home, but with COVID-19 and its associated restrictions, some music classes have had to make major adjustments.

The pandemic restrictions were not in favor of music in Guilford, as they forced online lessons and placed restrictions on in-person play, leading to interesting methods of teaching and performance. Some courses were easier to adapt than others.

“We’re a pretty tech-savvy bunch of people,” said Charles A Dana. Music teacher Kami Rowan. Virtual instruction and performance isn’t a foreign concept in the guitar world, and Rowan (who had a few virtual students herself before the pandemic) was still able to teach and compose pieces with her students.

The Guilford College Choir has taken a similar approach. Taking advantage of technology, Wendy Looker, choir director at Guilford, was able to put together unique performances using recordings, even one featuring choir alumni who sent their parts virtually for the start. . While nothing can replace the sense of community the choir creates, she said, it was certainly better than nothing and it made for some interesting projects.

The Jazz Ensemble, led by Drew P. Hays, had a hard time but managed to get by, and they were able to play anyway.

“(It was) amazing that we were able to do this…” Hays said. “But we weren’t able to do the thing like we usually would.”

Jazz music is very dependent on the subtle interaction between the performers. Rehearsing on Dana’s stage with the horn players 15 to 30 feet apart from each other made it difficult to synchronize with each other. They may have performed outside of some, but jazz had one of the most difficult times to practice and perform during the pandemic.

All courses have tentative plans for performances throughout the year. Rowan is preparing some of her students for the American Guitar Orchestra Ensemble, a project she created with an alum, which will be performing this summer. The choir planned a three-way collaborative performance with Exigence Vocal Ensemble (described on their website as “a professional vocal ensemble showcasing art within black and Latin communities ”) and the first choir of the Lutheran church. The Jazz Combo includes both an outdoor performance in the middle of the semester and an indoor performance towards the end of the semester.

At the start of 12 weeks, some courses are ready to incorporate in-person learning with scalable restrictions.

“We have it easier, we don’t blow on a wind instrument… we don’t sing,” Rowan said. For guitarists in guitar ensembles, the restrictions on COVID should not hamper them too much in practice and performance. A mask only covers your mouth and nose, so their ability to play is not impaired, and they are normally not too close to each other anyway.

Additionally, Rowan has extra confidence in their safety. “I’m really close to my guys,” she said. “I know the immunization status of my children… we are tight. Rowan sees her students five hours a week and is their counselor, so she knows that the whole is vaccinated. “We’re going to have a set this year.”

The students of the choir are not so close to their instructor. The choir, as a 1 credit elective course taking place during collaboration time, has a wide variety of participating students. From the average Guilfordian to student-athletes to the occasional Early College student, the choir is a microcosm of Guilford.

Nevertheless, the choir seems just as prepared. Looker is “ready to rehearse with everyone in the auditorium (Dana)”.

A massive auditorium with 900 seats, spacing won’t be a problem. The masks will no longer be as long as they are needed, as the choir will be equipped with singer masks. These are specially designed masks for singers with extra space. For the choir, “the big question is the audience,” Looker said.

These scalable restrictions could be a boon for the Jazz Combo, as close play spaces are their strong suit. They did not have a single COVID transmission of a repeat and sometimes used specialized PPE like bells and horn masks. Being in Dana certainly helped, but the hope is that they can move into the choir room as it’s a smaller space with better acoustics for the student musicians that can be ventilated.

For Hays, his goal is clear. “How can we ensure the safety of the public and of our musicians while preserving artistic integrity? Hays said. While pandemic restrictions have made playing difficult, jazz musicians have, and Hays “won’t sacrifice safety.”

There is also planned a cumulative performance at the end of the semester with a guitar ensemble, the Guilford College choir and a jazz ensemble. The plan is tentative, as COVID has been anything but predictable, but as it stands, the performance would take place in the Carnegie Hall in December.

It would also be after the College’s vaccination mandate, so hopefully with higher vaccination numbers some restrictions will be more flexible. With vaccines finally available and underway, the pandemic appears to be fading, and as virtual learning, mask warrants and social distancing rules are rolled back, it looks like the music in Guilford is about to kick in. prosper.


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With special guest Flea by her side, Patti Smith delivers powerful Big Sur performances. | Arts and culture blog https://f-bod.com/with-special-guest-flea-by-her-side-patti-smith-delivers-powerful-big-sur-performances-arts-and-culture-blog/ Wed, 08 Sep 2021 23:41:00 +0000 https://f-bod.com/with-special-guest-flea-by-her-side-patti-smith-delivers-powerful-big-sur-performances-arts-and-culture-blog/ With nearly half a century of performances to her credit, Patti Smith still commands a stage. Whether she shouts into a microphone, spits on the floor and forces the crowd to stand up during her punk rock ballads, or paints a thoughtful vibe as she spreads one of her poems, Smith keeps her audience excited. […]]]>

With nearly half a century of performances to her credit, Patti Smith still commands a stage. Whether she shouts into a microphone, spits on the floor and forces the crowd to stand up during her punk rock ballads, or paints a thoughtful vibe as she spreads one of her poems, Smith keeps her audience excited. in love.

The second night of his two-night run at Big Sur’s Henry Miller Memorial Library was further proof of his artistic power. Even with Flea, among the most famous and energetic faces in rock ‘n’ roll over the past 30 years, making a surprise appearance as the band’s bassist for the evening, public attention remained steady on Smith.

Hailed as an evening of words and music, Smith, icon of the 1970s New York punk rock movement and revered writer and poet, has woven his 18-track set between songs and poems, originals and covers. With Flea on bass, his son Jackson on lead guitar, and longtime collaborator Tony Shanahan alternating piano, guitar, and bass, Smith presented audiences with classic originals such as “Dancing Barefoot,” “Because the Night,” ” Redondo Beach ”and“ Gloria: In Excelsis Deo. ” She covered Stevie Wonder, Bob Dylan and riffed on The Beatles. During a halfway bathroom break for Smith, Shanahan led the band to a Rolling Stones medley, honoring the late drummer Charlie Watts.

Smith read original poetry with pieces like “An Ode to the Writer” and paid homage to local poetry icon Robinson Jeffers with a few of her selected poems, which she read while her band locked in the background, eventually leading to a screaming crescendo. Jeffers would have been proud and maybe even blushed when Smith admitted, “When I was younger I had a crush on Robinson Jeffers.”

With books like Just kids and Train M, Smith the writer has always portrayed herself as someone who isn’t ashamed of who she is, who loves her experiences and the intricate details that go into them. In front of the mostly 250-year-old crowd at Big Sur on Tuesday night, this character’s honesty was clear.

“I don’t mind being uncool,” Smith told the crowd. “Because when you’ve lived as long as I have, you go through times when you’re really cool and times when you’re really not cool. And then you’re cool again.

Towards the end of the evening, when the group performed “Because the Night”, dedicated to the father of their son, Fred “Sonic” Smith, the crowd was overjoyed, shedding older bodies and white hair to reveal young souls. and energetic, stomping on the ground and hitting the air as they screamed. Sometimes it was as if Flea, known for his crazy energy on stage, was trying to keep up with Smith.

For Smith, it was a successful “return” to the Henry Miller Memorial Library, which is celebrating its 40th anniversary.e birthday. Smith and his band performed the library’s first benefit concert in 2004. As library director Magnus Toren says, Smith was to perform the show at the library, which at the time was a still nascent music venue; However, when Toren received his team’s tech specs, he became overwhelmed and realized that there was no way the library could host a Patti Smith show.

So, in a few last minute maneuvers, the show was moved to the Sunset Theater in Carmel. Toren says the September 6-7 shows were, in a way, both a comeback and a debut for Smith.


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